Manual
Introduction
Installation
Invoking MusE
Window Reference Guide
Creating your setup
Getting Started
Software synthesizers coming with MusE
External Software synthesizers
Postproduction
Reference Information

Mastering

When you have recorded your ultimate translation of a steam train using only a triangle tuned d flat, you might feel a need to "Master" your piece. In simple words mastering is the process of finalizing your song so that it sounds okay on your listeners system. There is a lot' more to mastering than is available here, infact there are a number of books on the subject, so don't take this as the whole truth.
First of, MusE does not contain any tools for mastering, mainly it occurs after a mix-down is done (this process is described on another location in this manual) and before you distribute it to your potential listeners. However you wish to distribute, ogg (see below), pidgeon, *gasp* CD.
There are dedicated packages available that perform various kinds of mastering, a free such package is Jamin (http://jamin.sourceforge.net ) which we highly recommend. Jamin should contain all the tools you need to master your piece to highest possible standard.

OGG/MP3

Mp3 is no stranger today, infact it is pretty much the norm for music that is available online. There is however a problem with mp3, it is not legal to produce mp3 files without a license from the owners of the patent, Fraunhofer Institute. It could even be debated if it is allowed to play mp3's without a license, though I think the current consensus is that it IS.

Nevertheless, there are alternatives, good alternatives, so there is really no reason to subject yourself to these issues. A very good answer is OGG. (http://www.vorbis.com) OGG/Vorbis is a patent free codec that, according to several studies, have superior sound quality to mp3. Infact it rivals most current codecs. And, most importantly, it is entirely free and open source.

Publish Selfmade Music

Once up on a time there was mp3.com. No... once upon a time there was confusion, then there was mp3.com. No... first the dinosaurs came, mankind had not yet set foot on this planet... Hmmm.
I wish I could say there where any places we could recommend for publishing music online. There are lots of such places, none that really stick out as better (or less bad) than any others.
For now the best advice would be to shop around. Try to find some place with similar music as you are making yourself, or whichever quality you value most.

License Issues

When distributing music, or anything for that matter. You really need to dedicate a thought to the legal issues involved. Licenses and similar exist to add a layer(some ridiculously thick) of protection for either/or both the artist and the listener. Apart from protection they also dictate your rights.
In the free world a type of license called copyleft(as opposed to copyright) is common, this essentially gives the user (listener in this case) the right to as he pleases with the material as long as the original author is credited.
To learn more you could for instance check out:
http://creativecommons.org/.
More information is also available here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyleft.

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